Get plugged in to the Connected Vehicle #Hackathon through our favorite photos culled from social media posts. #atthack #nesthack  Get plugged in to the Connected Vehicle #Hackathon through our favorite photos culled from social media posts. #atthack #nesthack  Get plugged in to the Connected Vehicle #Hackathon through our favorite photos culled from social media posts. #atthack #nesthack  Get plugged in to the Connected Vehicle #Hackathon through our favorite photos culled from social media posts. #atthack #nesthack  Get plugged in to the Connected Vehicle #Hackathon through our favorite photos culled from social media posts. #atthack #nesthack  Get plugged in to the Connected Vehicle #Hackathon through our favorite photos culled from social media posts. #atthack #nesthack 

Get plugged in to the Connected Vehicle #Hackathon through our favorite photos culled from social media posts. #atthack #nesthack 

Here are photos from our signing ceremony with the Go Silicon Valley program, sponsored by Advantage Austria. It’s our second year working with a great series of companies.  Here are photos from our signing ceremony with the Go Silicon Valley program, sponsored by Advantage Austria. It’s our second year working with a great series of companies.  Here are photos from our signing ceremony with the Go Silicon Valley program, sponsored by Advantage Austria. It’s our second year working with a great series of companies.  Here are photos from our signing ceremony with the Go Silicon Valley program, sponsored by Advantage Austria. It’s our second year working with a great series of companies. 

Here are photos from our signing ceremony with the Go Silicon Valley program, sponsored by Advantage Austria. It’s our second year working with a great series of companies. 

On March 20, NestGSV signed an exchange agreement with Tenmou, the largest accelerator and startup fund in Bahrain. Pictured with NestGSV CEO Kayvan Baroumand, left, is Hasan Haider, chief executive officer at Tenmou. The signing was on Norooz, the first day of the Persian New Year. We see this as a sign of good things to come.  On March 20, NestGSV signed an exchange agreement with Tenmou, the largest accelerator and startup fund in Bahrain. Pictured with NestGSV CEO Kayvan Baroumand, left, is Hasan Haider, chief executive officer at Tenmou. The signing was on Norooz, the first day of the Persian New Year. We see this as a sign of good things to come.  On March 20, NestGSV signed an exchange agreement with Tenmou, the largest accelerator and startup fund in Bahrain. Pictured with NestGSV CEO Kayvan Baroumand, left, is Hasan Haider, chief executive officer at Tenmou. The signing was on Norooz, the first day of the Persian New Year. We see this as a sign of good things to come.  On March 20, NestGSV signed an exchange agreement with Tenmou, the largest accelerator and startup fund in Bahrain. Pictured with NestGSV CEO Kayvan Baroumand, left, is Hasan Haider, chief executive officer at Tenmou. The signing was on Norooz, the first day of the Persian New Year. We see this as a sign of good things to come.  On March 20, NestGSV signed an exchange agreement with Tenmou, the largest accelerator and startup fund in Bahrain. Pictured with NestGSV CEO Kayvan Baroumand, left, is Hasan Haider, chief executive officer at Tenmou. The signing was on Norooz, the first day of the Persian New Year. We see this as a sign of good things to come. 

On March 20, NestGSV signed an exchange agreement with Tenmou, the largest accelerator and startup fund in Bahrain. Pictured with NestGSV CEO Kayvan Baroumand, left, is Hasan Haider, chief executive officer at Tenmou. The signing was on Norooz, the first day of the Persian New Year. We see this as a sign of good things to come. 

Are you an entrepreneurial woman with an amazing idea you can’t wait to build? 

The AT&T Developer Program is producing a series of mobile app hackathons focused on engaging women. We’ve heard from many tech women that at hackathon events they frequently are relegated to project manager or note taker roles within the team. AT&T has adopted a progressive approach to innovation, one that embraces openness and encourages collaboration between entrepreneurs and professionals of all genders and backgrounds. We need your help spreading the word.

AT&T believes that women provide a critical spark to the tech industry. Through empowering opportunities like hackathons, female technologists will become catalysts to accelerate innovation and economic growth.

The first Women In Tech hackathon is April 11 in Atlanta. AT&T is proud to offer special prizes to women-led teams, with extra accelerator prizes awarded to all-female teams. Please visit the Eventbrite page.

We are also hosting WIT hackathons on July 18 in Washington, D.C.; Aug. 8 in Dallas; Sept. 9 in Palo Alto; and Oct. 3 in Seattle. Check out our website.
For these events, we’re seeking outreach assistance. We need developers, designers, coders, speakers and senseis. If you have questions or would like to discuss further, please contact Otis Taylor at otis@nestgsv.com. Are you an entrepreneurial woman with an amazing idea you can’t wait to build? 

The AT&T Developer Program is producing a series of mobile app hackathons focused on engaging women. We’ve heard from many tech women that at hackathon events they frequently are relegated to project manager or note taker roles within the team. AT&T has adopted a progressive approach to innovation, one that embraces openness and encourages collaboration between entrepreneurs and professionals of all genders and backgrounds. We need your help spreading the word.

AT&T believes that women provide a critical spark to the tech industry. Through empowering opportunities like hackathons, female technologists will become catalysts to accelerate innovation and economic growth.

The first Women In Tech hackathon is April 11 in Atlanta. AT&T is proud to offer special prizes to women-led teams, with extra accelerator prizes awarded to all-female teams. Please visit the Eventbrite page.

We are also hosting WIT hackathons on July 18 in Washington, D.C.; Aug. 8 in Dallas; Sept. 9 in Palo Alto; and Oct. 3 in Seattle. Check out our website.
For these events, we’re seeking outreach assistance. We need developers, designers, coders, speakers and senseis. If you have questions or would like to discuss further, please contact Otis Taylor at otis@nestgsv.com.
Are you an entrepreneurial woman with an amazing idea you can’t wait to build? 
The AT&T Developer Program is producing a series of mobile app hackathons focused on engaging women. We’ve heard from many tech women that at hackathon events they frequently are relegated to project manager or note taker roles within the team. AT&T has adopted a progressive approach to innovation, one that embraces openness and encourages collaboration between entrepreneurs and professionals of all genders and backgrounds. We need your help spreading the word.
AT&T believes that women provide a critical spark to the tech industry. Through empowering opportunities like hackathons, female technologists will become catalysts to accelerate innovation and economic growth.
The first Women In Tech hackathon is April 11 in Atlanta. AT&T is proud to offer special prizes to women-led teams, with extra accelerator prizes awarded to all-female teams. Please visit the Eventbrite page.
We are also hosting WIT hackathons on July 18 in Washington, D.C.; Aug. 8 in Dallas; Sept. 9 in Palo Alto; and Oct. 3 in Seattle. Check out our website.

For these events, we’re seeking outreach assistance. We need developers, designers, coders, speakers and senseis. If you have questions or would like to discuss further, please contact Otis Taylor at otis@nestgsv.com.

NestGSV is partnering with AT&T, MOJIO, Ann Arbor Spark and Gracenote for the Connected Vehicle Hackathon April 4-5 at our space in Redwood City. Why is the connected car drawing so much attention in the technology?

Because the cars of the future are ready to hit the road today. 

According to Bloomberg, vehicle-to-vehicle communications might be required before President Barack Obama leaves office in early 2017. And Reuters noted that U.S. regulators are pushing for the vehicle-to-vehicle dialogue because the communication will reduce accidents and alleviate traffic congestion. 

For those of us who drive to Silicon Valley, who wouldn’t welcome a faster and smarter commute? At the very least, the connected car is going to give Click and Clack more to discuss on NPR’s “Car Talk.” 

The car has long been a star on the big and small screen, but now it’s a tech star. What will the talking cars of the future look like? We decided to take a look back at some of the best fictional connected cars. Vehicles that, at least on the screen, were ahead of their time. 

KITT: The 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, with its red, scanning LED grill, was the technologically perfect star of “Knight Rider.” Even with Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) steering it onto troubled paths. KITT was more than a car; it was a character, a bullet proof companion. Why did NBC try to remake this show? Good thing TV networks aren’t in the car business because there is no room for lemons in the connected car lane.

“Cars”: OK, so the CGI animated franchise doesn’t feature actual road vehicles, but you do get the sense that Disney executives understand that cars need to smartly interact with each other to achieve optimal efficiency on the road. After all, commuting and running errands isn’t a NASCAR race. 

Herbie: Herbie? Herbie Hancock? No, Herbie the 1963 VW Beetle that began its ascent to stardom with 1968’s “The Love Bug.” Herbie, a Beetle with the racing No. 53, has ruled the road for decades. Even Lindsay Lohan couldn’t crash him “Herbie: Fully Loaded.”  

“The Transformers”: Plenty of vehicles to select from, but Bumblebee, since we first met him as a cartoon, has always been our a favorite. But then, when “The Transformers” hit the big screen, Bumblebee transformed from a VW Beetle to a rally yellow Chevrolet Camaro. What’s up with that?

Mach 5: Only one question exists: which Speed Racer do you prefer — the animated version or the movie? 

Benny: If you’ve never seen “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?,” you don’t know who Benny is. Look him up; he’s a fine fellow.  

“My Mother the Car”: Laugh all you want at the title of this 1960’s show title, because plenty of critics have mocked the show. According to Wikipedia, in 2002 TV Guide proclaimed it to be even worse than the “Jerry Springer Show.” What about the car? It was a 1928 Porter touring car that turned out to be a reincarnation of the owner’s deceased mother. Lame, right? Still, the show gave voice to another vehicle. 

Soon all of ours will be talking to us — and each other. Learn more about the connected vehicle by coming to our hackathon. 



NestGSV is partnering with AT&T, MOJIO, Ann Arbor Spark and Gracenote for the Connected Vehicle Hackathon April 4-5 at our space in Redwood City. Why is the connected car drawing so much attention in the technology?

Because the cars of the future are ready to hit the road today. 

According to Bloomberg, vehicle-to-vehicle communications might be required before President Barack Obama leaves office in early 2017. And Reuters noted that U.S. regulators are pushing for the vehicle-to-vehicle dialogue because the communication will reduce accidents and alleviate traffic congestion. 

For those of us who drive to Silicon Valley, who wouldn’t welcome a faster and smarter commute? At the very least, the connected car is going to give Click and Clack more to discuss on NPR’s “Car Talk.” 

The car has long been a star on the big and small screen, but now it’s a tech star. What will the talking cars of the future look like? We decided to take a look back at some of the best fictional connected cars. Vehicles that, at least on the screen, were ahead of their time. 

KITT: The 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, with its red, scanning LED grill, was the technologically perfect star of “Knight Rider.” Even with Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) steering it onto troubled paths. KITT was more than a car; it was a character, a bullet proof companion. Why did NBC try to remake this show? Good thing TV networks aren’t in the car business because there is no room for lemons in the connected car lane.

“Cars”: OK, so the CGI animated franchise doesn’t feature actual road vehicles, but you do get the sense that Disney executives understand that cars need to smartly interact with each other to achieve optimal efficiency on the road. After all, commuting and running errands isn’t a NASCAR race. 

Herbie: Herbie? Herbie Hancock? No, Herbie the 1963 VW Beetle that began its ascent to stardom with 1968’s “The Love Bug.” Herbie, a Beetle with the racing No. 53, has ruled the road for decades. Even Lindsay Lohan couldn’t crash him “Herbie: Fully Loaded.”  

“The Transformers”: Plenty of vehicles to select from, but Bumblebee, since we first met him as a cartoon, has always been our a favorite. But then, when “The Transformers” hit the big screen, Bumblebee transformed from a VW Beetle to a rally yellow Chevrolet Camaro. What’s up with that?

Mach 5: Only one question exists: which Speed Racer do you prefer — the animated version or the movie? 

Benny: If you’ve never seen “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?,” you don’t know who Benny is. Look him up; he’s a fine fellow.  

“My Mother the Car”: Laugh all you want at the title of this 1960’s show title, because plenty of critics have mocked the show. According to Wikipedia, in 2002 TV Guide proclaimed it to be even worse than the “Jerry Springer Show.” What about the car? It was a 1928 Porter touring car that turned out to be a reincarnation of the owner’s deceased mother. Lame, right? Still, the show gave voice to another vehicle. 

Soon all of ours will be talking to us — and each other. Learn more about the connected vehicle by coming to our hackathon. 



NestGSV is partnering with AT&T, MOJIO, Ann Arbor Spark and Gracenote for the Connected Vehicle Hackathon April 4-5 at our space in Redwood City. Why is the connected car drawing so much attention in the technology?

Because the cars of the future are ready to hit the road today. 

According to Bloomberg, vehicle-to-vehicle communications might be required before President Barack Obama leaves office in early 2017. And Reuters noted that U.S. regulators are pushing for the vehicle-to-vehicle dialogue because the communication will reduce accidents and alleviate traffic congestion. 

For those of us who drive to Silicon Valley, who wouldn’t welcome a faster and smarter commute? At the very least, the connected car is going to give Click and Clack more to discuss on NPR’s “Car Talk.” 

The car has long been a star on the big and small screen, but now it’s a tech star. What will the talking cars of the future look like? We decided to take a look back at some of the best fictional connected cars. Vehicles that, at least on the screen, were ahead of their time. 

KITT: The 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, with its red, scanning LED grill, was the technologically perfect star of “Knight Rider.” Even with Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) steering it onto troubled paths. KITT was more than a car; it was a character, a bullet proof companion. Why did NBC try to remake this show? Good thing TV networks aren’t in the car business because there is no room for lemons in the connected car lane.

“Cars”: OK, so the CGI animated franchise doesn’t feature actual road vehicles, but you do get the sense that Disney executives understand that cars need to smartly interact with each other to achieve optimal efficiency on the road. After all, commuting and running errands isn’t a NASCAR race. 

Herbie: Herbie? Herbie Hancock? No, Herbie the 1963 VW Beetle that began its ascent to stardom with 1968’s “The Love Bug.” Herbie, a Beetle with the racing No. 53, has ruled the road for decades. Even Lindsay Lohan couldn’t crash him “Herbie: Fully Loaded.”  

“The Transformers”: Plenty of vehicles to select from, but Bumblebee, since we first met him as a cartoon, has always been our a favorite. But then, when “The Transformers” hit the big screen, Bumblebee transformed from a VW Beetle to a rally yellow Chevrolet Camaro. What’s up with that?

Mach 5: Only one question exists: which Speed Racer do you prefer — the animated version or the movie? 

Benny: If you’ve never seen “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?,” you don’t know who Benny is. Look him up; he’s a fine fellow.  

“My Mother the Car”: Laugh all you want at the title of this 1960’s show title, because plenty of critics have mocked the show. According to Wikipedia, in 2002 TV Guide proclaimed it to be even worse than the “Jerry Springer Show.” What about the car? It was a 1928 Porter touring car that turned out to be a reincarnation of the owner’s deceased mother. Lame, right? Still, the show gave voice to another vehicle. 

Soon all of ours will be talking to us — and each other. Learn more about the connected vehicle by coming to our hackathon. 



NestGSV is partnering with AT&T, MOJIO, Ann Arbor Spark and Gracenote for the Connected Vehicle Hackathon April 4-5 at our space in Redwood City. Why is the connected car drawing so much attention in the technology?

Because the cars of the future are ready to hit the road today. 

According to Bloomberg, vehicle-to-vehicle communications might be required before President Barack Obama leaves office in early 2017. And Reuters noted that U.S. regulators are pushing for the vehicle-to-vehicle dialogue because the communication will reduce accidents and alleviate traffic congestion. 

For those of us who drive to Silicon Valley, who wouldn’t welcome a faster and smarter commute? At the very least, the connected car is going to give Click and Clack more to discuss on NPR’s “Car Talk.” 

The car has long been a star on the big and small screen, but now it’s a tech star. What will the talking cars of the future look like? We decided to take a look back at some of the best fictional connected cars. Vehicles that, at least on the screen, were ahead of their time. 

KITT: The 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, with its red, scanning LED grill, was the technologically perfect star of “Knight Rider.” Even with Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) steering it onto troubled paths. KITT was more than a car; it was a character, a bullet proof companion. Why did NBC try to remake this show? Good thing TV networks aren’t in the car business because there is no room for lemons in the connected car lane.

“Cars”: OK, so the CGI animated franchise doesn’t feature actual road vehicles, but you do get the sense that Disney executives understand that cars need to smartly interact with each other to achieve optimal efficiency on the road. After all, commuting and running errands isn’t a NASCAR race. 

Herbie: Herbie? Herbie Hancock? No, Herbie the 1963 VW Beetle that began its ascent to stardom with 1968’s “The Love Bug.” Herbie, a Beetle with the racing No. 53, has ruled the road for decades. Even Lindsay Lohan couldn’t crash him “Herbie: Fully Loaded.”  

“The Transformers”: Plenty of vehicles to select from, but Bumblebee, since we first met him as a cartoon, has always been our a favorite. But then, when “The Transformers” hit the big screen, Bumblebee transformed from a VW Beetle to a rally yellow Chevrolet Camaro. What’s up with that?

Mach 5: Only one question exists: which Speed Racer do you prefer — the animated version or the movie? 

Benny: If you’ve never seen “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?,” you don’t know who Benny is. Look him up; he’s a fine fellow.  

“My Mother the Car”: Laugh all you want at the title of this 1960’s show title, because plenty of critics have mocked the show. According to Wikipedia, in 2002 TV Guide proclaimed it to be even worse than the “Jerry Springer Show.” What about the car? It was a 1928 Porter touring car that turned out to be a reincarnation of the owner’s deceased mother. Lame, right? Still, the show gave voice to another vehicle. 

Soon all of ours will be talking to us — and each other. Learn more about the connected vehicle by coming to our hackathon. 



NestGSV is partnering with AT&T, MOJIO, Ann Arbor Spark and Gracenote for the Connected Vehicle Hackathon April 4-5 at our space in Redwood City. Why is the connected car drawing so much attention in the technology?

Because the cars of the future are ready to hit the road today. 

According to Bloomberg, vehicle-to-vehicle communications might be required before President Barack Obama leaves office in early 2017. And Reuters noted that U.S. regulators are pushing for the vehicle-to-vehicle dialogue because the communication will reduce accidents and alleviate traffic congestion. 

For those of us who drive to Silicon Valley, who wouldn’t welcome a faster and smarter commute? At the very least, the connected car is going to give Click and Clack more to discuss on NPR’s “Car Talk.” 

The car has long been a star on the big and small screen, but now it’s a tech star. What will the talking cars of the future look like? We decided to take a look back at some of the best fictional connected cars. Vehicles that, at least on the screen, were ahead of their time. 

KITT: The 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, with its red, scanning LED grill, was the technologically perfect star of “Knight Rider.” Even with Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) steering it onto troubled paths. KITT was more than a car; it was a character, a bullet proof companion. Why did NBC try to remake this show? Good thing TV networks aren’t in the car business because there is no room for lemons in the connected car lane.

“Cars”: OK, so the CGI animated franchise doesn’t feature actual road vehicles, but you do get the sense that Disney executives understand that cars need to smartly interact with each other to achieve optimal efficiency on the road. After all, commuting and running errands isn’t a NASCAR race. 

Herbie: Herbie? Herbie Hancock? No, Herbie the 1963 VW Beetle that began its ascent to stardom with 1968’s “The Love Bug.” Herbie, a Beetle with the racing No. 53, has ruled the road for decades. Even Lindsay Lohan couldn’t crash him “Herbie: Fully Loaded.”  

“The Transformers”: Plenty of vehicles to select from, but Bumblebee, since we first met him as a cartoon, has always been our a favorite. But then, when “The Transformers” hit the big screen, Bumblebee transformed from a VW Beetle to a rally yellow Chevrolet Camaro. What’s up with that?

Mach 5: Only one question exists: which Speed Racer do you prefer — the animated version or the movie? 

Benny: If you’ve never seen “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?,” you don’t know who Benny is. Look him up; he’s a fine fellow.  

“My Mother the Car”: Laugh all you want at the title of this 1960’s show title, because plenty of critics have mocked the show. According to Wikipedia, in 2002 TV Guide proclaimed it to be even worse than the “Jerry Springer Show.” What about the car? It was a 1928 Porter touring car that turned out to be a reincarnation of the owner’s deceased mother. Lame, right? Still, the show gave voice to another vehicle. 

Soon all of ours will be talking to us — and each other. Learn more about the connected vehicle by coming to our hackathon. 



NestGSV is partnering with AT&T, MOJIO, Ann Arbor Spark and Gracenote for the Connected Vehicle Hackathon April 4-5 at our space in Redwood City. Why is the connected car drawing so much attention in the technology?

Because the cars of the future are ready to hit the road today. 

According to Bloomberg, vehicle-to-vehicle communications might be required before President Barack Obama leaves office in early 2017. And Reuters noted that U.S. regulators are pushing for the vehicle-to-vehicle dialogue because the communication will reduce accidents and alleviate traffic congestion. 

For those of us who drive to Silicon Valley, who wouldn’t welcome a faster and smarter commute? At the very least, the connected car is going to give Click and Clack more to discuss on NPR’s “Car Talk.” 

The car has long been a star on the big and small screen, but now it’s a tech star. What will the talking cars of the future look like? We decided to take a look back at some of the best fictional connected cars. Vehicles that, at least on the screen, were ahead of their time. 

KITT: The 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, with its red, scanning LED grill, was the technologically perfect star of “Knight Rider.” Even with Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) steering it onto troubled paths. KITT was more than a car; it was a character, a bullet proof companion. Why did NBC try to remake this show? Good thing TV networks aren’t in the car business because there is no room for lemons in the connected car lane.

“Cars”: OK, so the CGI animated franchise doesn’t feature actual road vehicles, but you do get the sense that Disney executives understand that cars need to smartly interact with each other to achieve optimal efficiency on the road. After all, commuting and running errands isn’t a NASCAR race. 

Herbie: Herbie? Herbie Hancock? No, Herbie the 1963 VW Beetle that began its ascent to stardom with 1968’s “The Love Bug.” Herbie, a Beetle with the racing No. 53, has ruled the road for decades. Even Lindsay Lohan couldn’t crash him “Herbie: Fully Loaded.”  

“The Transformers”: Plenty of vehicles to select from, but Bumblebee, since we first met him as a cartoon, has always been our a favorite. But then, when “The Transformers” hit the big screen, Bumblebee transformed from a VW Beetle to a rally yellow Chevrolet Camaro. What’s up with that?

Mach 5: Only one question exists: which Speed Racer do you prefer — the animated version or the movie? 

Benny: If you’ve never seen “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?,” you don’t know who Benny is. Look him up; he’s a fine fellow.  

“My Mother the Car”: Laugh all you want at the title of this 1960’s show title, because plenty of critics have mocked the show. According to Wikipedia, in 2002 TV Guide proclaimed it to be even worse than the “Jerry Springer Show.” What about the car? It was a 1928 Porter touring car that turned out to be a reincarnation of the owner’s deceased mother. Lame, right? Still, the show gave voice to another vehicle. 

Soon all of ours will be talking to us — and each other. Learn more about the connected vehicle by coming to our hackathon. 



NestGSV is partnering with AT&T, MOJIO, Ann Arbor Spark and Gracenote for the Connected Vehicle Hackathon April 4-5 at our space in Redwood City. Why is the connected car drawing so much attention in the technology?

Because the cars of the future are ready to hit the road today. 

According to Bloomberg, vehicle-to-vehicle communications might be required before President Barack Obama leaves office in early 2017. And Reuters noted that U.S. regulators are pushing for the vehicle-to-vehicle dialogue because the communication will reduce accidents and alleviate traffic congestion. 

For those of us who drive to Silicon Valley, who wouldn’t welcome a faster and smarter commute? At the very least, the connected car is going to give Click and Clack more to discuss on NPR’s “Car Talk.” 

The car has long been a star on the big and small screen, but now it’s a tech star. What will the talking cars of the future look like? We decided to take a look back at some of the best fictional connected cars. Vehicles that, at least on the screen, were ahead of their time. 

KITT: The 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, with its red, scanning LED grill, was the technologically perfect star of “Knight Rider.” Even with Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) steering it onto troubled paths. KITT was more than a car; it was a character, a bullet proof companion. Why did NBC try to remake this show? Good thing TV networks aren’t in the car business because there is no room for lemons in the connected car lane.

“Cars”: OK, so the CGI animated franchise doesn’t feature actual road vehicles, but you do get the sense that Disney executives understand that cars need to smartly interact with each other to achieve optimal efficiency on the road. After all, commuting and running errands isn’t a NASCAR race. 

Herbie: Herbie? Herbie Hancock? No, Herbie the 1963 VW Beetle that began its ascent to stardom with 1968’s “The Love Bug.” Herbie, a Beetle with the racing No. 53, has ruled the road for decades. Even Lindsay Lohan couldn’t crash him “Herbie: Fully Loaded.”  

“The Transformers”: Plenty of vehicles to select from, but Bumblebee, since we first met him as a cartoon, has always been our a favorite. But then, when “The Transformers” hit the big screen, Bumblebee transformed from a VW Beetle to a rally yellow Chevrolet Camaro. What’s up with that?

Mach 5: Only one question exists: which Speed Racer do you prefer — the animated version or the movie? 

Benny: If you’ve never seen “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?,” you don’t know who Benny is. Look him up; he’s a fine fellow.  

“My Mother the Car”: Laugh all you want at the title of this 1960’s show title, because plenty of critics have mocked the show. According to Wikipedia, in 2002 TV Guide proclaimed it to be even worse than the “Jerry Springer Show.” What about the car? It was a 1928 Porter touring car that turned out to be a reincarnation of the owner’s deceased mother. Lame, right? Still, the show gave voice to another vehicle. 

Soon all of ours will be talking to us — and each other. Learn more about the connected vehicle by coming to our hackathon. 

NestGSV is partnering with AT&T, MOJIO, Ann Arbor Spark and Gracenote for the Connected Vehicle Hackathon April 4-5 at our space in Redwood City. Why is the connected car drawing so much attention in the technology?

Because the cars of the future are ready to hit the road today. 

According to Bloomberg, vehicle-to-vehicle communications might be required before President Barack Obama leaves office in early 2017. And Reuters noted that U.S. regulators are pushing for the vehicle-to-vehicle dialogue because the communication will reduce accidents and alleviate traffic congestion. 

For those of us who drive to Silicon Valley, who wouldn’t welcome a faster and smarter commute? At the very least, the connected car is going to give Click and Clack more to discuss on NPR’s “Car Talk.” 

The car has long been a star on the big and small screen, but now it’s a tech star. What will the talking cars of the future look like? We decided to take a look back at some of the best fictional connected cars. Vehicles that, at least on the screen, were ahead of their time. 

KITT: The 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, with its red, scanning LED grill, was the technologically perfect star of “Knight Rider.” Even with Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) steering it onto troubled paths. KITT was more than a car; it was a character, a bullet proof companion. Why did NBC try to remake this show? Good thing TV networks aren’t in the car business because there is no room for lemons in the connected car lane.

“Cars”: OK, so the CGI animated franchise doesn’t feature actual road vehicles, but you do get the sense that Disney executives understand that cars need to smartly interact with each other to achieve optimal efficiency on the road. After all, commuting and running errands isn’t a NASCAR race. 

Herbie: Herbie? Herbie Hancock? No, Herbie the 1963 VW Beetle that began its ascent to stardom with 1968’s “The Love Bug.” Herbie, a Beetle with the racing No. 53, has ruled the road for decades. Even Lindsay Lohan couldn’t crash him “Herbie: Fully Loaded.”  

“The Transformers”: Plenty of vehicles to select from, but Bumblebee, since we first met him as a cartoon, has always been our a favorite. But then, when “The Transformers” hit the big screen, Bumblebee transformed from a VW Beetle to a rally yellow Chevrolet Camaro. What’s up with that?

Mach 5: Only one question exists: which Speed Racer do you prefer — the animated version or the movie? 

Benny: If you’ve never seen “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?,” you don’t know who Benny is. Look him up; he’s a fine fellow.  

“My Mother the Car”: Laugh all you want at the title of this 1960’s show title, because plenty of critics have mocked the show. According to Wikipedia, in 2002 TV Guide proclaimed it to be even worse than the “Jerry Springer Show.” What about the car? It was a 1928 Porter touring car that turned out to be a reincarnation of the owner’s deceased mother. Lame, right? Still, the show gave voice to another vehicle. 

Soon all of ours will be talking to us — and each other. Learn more about the connected vehicle by coming to our hackathon

I believe I can fly. And why not? #startups #sports #capes

Technology, apparently, isn’t the answer to avoiding close talking. #closetalking #tech #beam

mashable:

Vine’s Newest Trend Is A #Whaling Good Time
Breaching isn’t just for whales anymore.

Better than planking. For sure. mashable:

Vine’s Newest Trend Is A #Whaling Good Time
Breaching isn’t just for whales anymore.

Better than planking. For sure. mashable:

Vine’s Newest Trend Is A #Whaling Good Time
Breaching isn’t just for whales anymore.

Better than planking. For sure. mashable:

Vine’s Newest Trend Is A #Whaling Good Time
Breaching isn’t just for whales anymore.

Better than planking. For sure.

mashable:

Vine’s Newest Trend Is A #Whaling Good Time

Breaching isn’t just for whales anymore.

Better than planking. For sure.

Our upcoming #hackathon schedule. The first is April 4-5 for the connected car

At the Feb. 11 JETRO event at NestGSV, there was a sushi chef — and plenty of people.  At the Feb. 11 JETRO event at NestGSV, there was a sushi chef — and plenty of people.  At the Feb. 11 JETRO event at NestGSV, there was a sushi chef — and plenty of people.  At the Feb. 11 JETRO event at NestGSV, there was a sushi chef — and plenty of people.  At the Feb. 11 JETRO event at NestGSV, there was a sushi chef — and plenty of people.  At the Feb. 11 JETRO event at NestGSV, there was a sushi chef — and plenty of people. 

At the Feb. 11 JETRO event at NestGSV, there was a sushi chef — and plenty of people.